Problem/Target Properties in Columbia-Savin Hill

The Columbia Savin Hill Civic Association (CSHCA) looks for properties in our neighborhood that are unsafe, unattractive, under-utilized, or has problems in other ways. We ask you to help us identify such properties and, if you’re willing, help us deal with them.

Please join us to help develop strategies to address each problem property or send an e-mail that identifies properties you’re not happy about. Address the e-mail to our Planning Committee chair, Eileen Fenton.

There are two major reasons to do this. The first reason is, simply, that we want to live in a quality neighborhood. While the vast numbers of parcels in the CSHCA area are nice, we do have some problem properties. We believe that the civic association can help improve these.

The second reason is that there are resources out there that could help if property owners were aware of them. The City of Boston has programs to help both home owners and business owners. Very often, many owners know nothing about them.

Additionally, the Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation (DBEDC), a non-profit development company started by CSHCA members in 1978, offers both grants and loans to eligible residents. The grants range from $15,000 for a single family to $30,000 for a three family. These grants (that means free money!) are restricted to homeowners with household incomes less than $62,000. DBEDC has below market rate loans for higher income households and businesses. Again, most property owners don’t know about these resources.

The Planning Committee does not intend to be nasty, aggressive or strident in dealing with property owners. Our intention is to help property owners access resources necessary to improve their properties. Having the civic association actively supporting the property owner will help the owner. An owner that improves his/her property helps the neighborhood.

Please send us your problem sites and consider joining the committee to work on them.

54 Pleasant Street Development Project: Deadline For Comments Is August 11

Image of proposed development at 54 Pleasant Street

The last neighborhood meeting about the 54 Pleasant Street development project was held on August 1st. According to the Dorchester Reporter:

“The development team offered two stark choices… saying the neighbors could get on board with a well-designed set of 17 condominium units or be left with a blocky set of nine rental units with above-ground parking. At a well-attended meeting hosted by the Boston Planning and Development Agency (BPDA), neighbors expressed their discontent with the scope of the development and potential impacts on traffic and safety in the area…”

The proposed new condominium building would replace the existing Scally & Trayers Funeral Home at 54 Pleasant Street. Also:

“Attendees asked for alternatives to the underground parking in trade for a smaller unit count. Eileen Boyle of the Columbia-Savin Hill Civic Association proposed nine units, but over a floor of above-ground parking to maintain the building’s shape… Sonia Kaszuba, who lives on Pearl Street, started a neighborhood petition to get the units reduced. In conversations with abutters, some were vehemently opposed to anything above six units, with others okay with a dozen. They split the difference and have been asking for nine.”

“[BPDA project manager John] Campbell dismissed the idea of the petition, which had gathered 85 signatories by Aug. 1. “Petitions don’t count for anything at all,” he said, asking instead that people submit comments to him via website, email, or mail. A public comment period on the proposal is open until Aug. 11…”

Residents and the BPDA clashed about zoning because the proposed development:

“… has a floor area ratio of 1.53, which [Pearl Street resident Mel] Parker pointed out is more than three times the ratio allowed by zoning… The higher the ratio, the more dense the development… BPDA project manager John Campbell, who was moderating the meeting, quickly reacted to Parker’s statements. “Do you realize how outdated that is?” he asked. “You’re talking about a 50-year-old zoning code… the zoning code is being changed neighborhood by neighborhood, and that’s what the Zoning Board of Appeals is for…”

Reportedly, several residents were shocked by that response, since current zoning law is the law.

Interested residents can view preliminary project documents and submit comments at the BPDA site, and join the 54 Pleasant Street Abutters group on Facebook.

Next Meeting: 54 Pleasant Street Development Project

The next neighborhood meeting about the proposed 17-unit condo development project at 54 Pleasant Street will be:

Date: Tuesday, August 1
Time: 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Location: McLaughlin Center / Boys & Girls Club, 1135 Dorchester Ave

A prior neighborhood meeting was held on July 22. To learn more about this project, attend this upcoming meeting. Spread the word or join the 54 Pleasant Street Abutters group on Facebook.

Neighborhood Meeting About Proposed Development At 54 Pleasant Street

There will be a neighborhood meeting about the proposed 17-unit condo development project at 54 Pleasant Street:

Date: Saturday, July 22, 2017
Time: 10:00 – 11:00 am
Location: Christ The Rock Church, 48 Pleasant Street

A group of concerned neighbors met on February 4, 2017 to discuss this project, which would replace the existing Scally-Trayers Funeral Home. The group consensus was that the 17-unit project was, “too large and excessive for this property, and poses a significant impact upon density (a/k/a “cramming”)… Sentiments were shared with the developer Joey Arcari and with the Columbia-Savin Hill Civic Association at multiple Planning Committee Meetings, whose board members agree there is a definite validity to all of these concerns…”

To learn more about the project, please attend this neighborhood meeting. According to the flyer, Councilor Baker will attend this meeting:

“The Planning Board, Mayor’s Office, and Councilor Frank Baker have explicitly said they are looking to hear from the neighborhood before deciding upon their final position, either for or against this project”

Spread the word or join the 54 Pleasant Street Abutters group on Facebook. If you are unable to attend the meeting and support a reduced scale development project, then sign the online petition.